30
Jun
2015

Bree Newsome Speaks Out After Being Jailed For Removing Confederate Flag: Black Lives Matter. This is non-negotiable.

Written by thejasminebrand in Blog
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Bree Newsome Speaks Out-after flag arrest-the jasmine brand

Over the weekend, a community organizer — named Brittany ‘Bree’ Newsome — brought national attention to herself, after she removed the Confederate battle flag. Long story short, she scaled a metal pole using a climbing harness, to remove the flag from the grounds of the South Carolina state capitol. She was immediately arrested, along with ally James Ian Tyson, who is also from Charlotte, North Carolina. Bree is speaking out for the first time, via a statement to Blue Nation Review:

Read the entire statement below.

Now is the time for true courage.
I realized that now is the time for true courage the morning after the Charleston Massacre shook me to the core of my being. I couldn’t sleep. I sat awake in the dead of night. All the ghosts of the past seemed to be rising.
Not long ago, I had watched the beginning of Selma, the reenactment of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing and had shuddered at the horrors of history.
But this was neither a scene from a movie nor was it the past. A white man had just entered a black church and massacred people as they prayed. He had assassinated a civil rights leader. This was not a page in a textbook I was reading nor an inscription on a monument I was visiting.
This was now.
This was real.
This was—this is—still happening.

I began my activism by participating in the Moral Monday movement, fighting to restore voting rights in North Carolina after the Supreme Court struck down key protections of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. I traveled down to Florida where the Dream Defenders were demanding justice for Trayvon Martin, who reminded me of a modern-day Emmett Till.
I marched with the Ohio Students Association as they demanded justice for victims of police brutality.

I watched in horror as black Americans were tear-gassed in their own neighborhoods in Ferguson, MO. “Reminds me of the Klan,” my grandmother said as we watched the news together. As a young black girl in South Carolina, she had witnessed the Klan drag her neighbor from his house and brutally beat him because he was a black physician who had treated a white woman.

I visited with black residents of West Baltimore, MD who, under curfew, had to present work papers to police to enter and exit their own neighborhood. “These are my freedom papers to show the slave catchers,” my friend said with a wry smile. And now, in the past 6 days, I’ve seen arson attacks against 5 black churches in the South, including in Charlotte, NC where I organize alongside other community members striving to create greater self-sufficiency and political empowerment in low-income neighborhoods.

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  • m

    Proud of her!