Jay-Z Sues Photographer Of ‘Reasonable Doubt’ Album Cover For Using His Likeness W/o Permission, Photographer Claims He’s Protected By 1st Amendment

Jay-Z Sues Photographer Of ‘Reasonable Doubt’ Album Cover For Using His Likeness W/o Permission, Photographer Claims He’s Protected By 1st Amendment

Jay-Z may be keeping busy by growing his empire, but he still has the time to come for those who he believes wronged him!

Legal documents obtained by TMZ reveal Jay-Z (born Shawn Carter) is suing Jonathan Mannion–the photographer who shot the cover of the rapper’s debut album, 1996’s Reasonable Doubt.

Specifically, Jay-Z claims the photographer has been exploiting his image and likeness without his consent. To support these claims, the music mogul says Jonathan Mannion sells various images and merch featuring the rapper, alleging:

“[Jonathan Mannion’s making the] arrogant assumption that because he took those photographs, he can do with them as he pleases.”

Additionally, Jay-Z points out:

“[It’s] ironic that a photographer would treat the image of a formerly-unknown Black teenager, now wildly successful, as a piece of property to be squeezed for every dollar it can produce. It stops today.”

As such, Jay-Z is suing the photographer in order to get him to stop using the rapper’s likeness–and to cough up the profits he’s made from Jay-Z‘s image. However, a representative for Jonathan Mannion has responded to the lawsuit, telling TMZ:

Authored by: Nick Alexander Fenley