21 Savage Responds To People Pulling Up His Own Lyrics After He Calls For An End To Gun Violence In Atlanta: A Song Is For Entertainment

Rapper 21 Savage Responds To People Pulling Up His Own Lyrics After He Calls For An End To Gun Violence In Atlanta: A Song Is For Entertainment

21 Savage may have had good intentions, but in the eyes of social media users, he’s just not the right messenger.

In a tweet, 21 Savage (real name Shéyaa Bin Abraham-Joseph) said,

“Atlanta We Have To Do Better / Put The F****** Guns Down !!!!!”

21 Savage tweet

It didn’t take long for social media users to dive in to the replies, using the rapper’s own lyrics as receipts. One Twitter user replied with a snippet of 21 Savage‘s feature on Drake‘s track Jimmy Cooks. It said,

“Spin the block twice like it ain’t nowhere to park”

To which 21 Savage replied,

“A Song Is For Entertainment It’s Not An Instruction Manual On How To Live Life In Real Life I Give Away A lot Of Money And Spread Financial Literacy To My Community Stop Trying To Make Me 1 Dimensional”

But as far as Twitter is concerned, actions do not speak louder than words—especially as it relates to gun violence.

Another user replied to the rapper using the famous

“THIS YOU??????”

The replies didn’t stop there, with several other users seemingly using the rapper’s lyrics against him.

21 Savage lyrics

21 Savage lyrics

21 Savage lyrics

21 Savage lyrics

Another Twitter user even questioned whether a legal case was brewing against the rapper. The tweet said,

“That RICO must be comin his way lol”

21 Savage lyrics

21 Savage‘s tweet and the subsequent replies come as Young Slime Life (YSL) rappers Young Thug and Gunna sit in the Cobb County Jail on RICO charges. Prosecutors cited the rappers song lyrics and music videos as evidence in the case.

Since then, Congressman Jamaal Bowman (D-NY) and Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) have presented the Restoring Artistic Protection Act (RAP Act), which aims to safeguard a musician’s freedom of speech by prohibiting the use of rap lyrics as admissible evidence in court.

In a statement, Rep. Hank Johnson said,

“Freedom of speech is the constitutional foundation the framers thought necessary to enable a new and free society to craft not only its own destiny through commerce and innovations, but through culture, expression, and art.”

Jamaal Bowman added,

“Rap, hip-hop and every lyrical musical piece is a beautiful form of art and expression that must be protected.”

What are your thoughts on the entire situation? Let us know in the comments!

[VIA]

Authored by: ShaCamree Gowdy