Spinderella Asks Judge For Restraining Order Against Salt-N-Pepa

Salt-N-Pepa & Spinderella

Spinderella Asks Judge For Restraining Order Against Salt-N-Pepa

The legal drama between Salt-N-Pepa and Spinderella continues. Spinderella, whose real name is Deidra Roper, has reportedly requested a temporary restraining order against the rap duo. A hearing on her request was scheduled to be heard in a Dallas. Spinderella’s attorney, Paul Stafford, spoke up on her behalf and told the court,

“Spinderella is seeking injunctive relief due to the immediate and irreparable harm that has been caused to her due to the acts and omissions of the defendants. Before we filed this lawsuit, we intended to resolve the matter with all the defendants, but we were unable to do so, and it’s unfortunate that the defendants have chosen not to try and honor Spinderella’s role in the group or their financial or legal commitments to her. So she was in a position where she had to force her rights and protect her brand, so that’s what we’re doing.”

Salt, Spinderella, Pepa

theJasmineBRAND previously reported that Spinderella is suing Salt-N-Pepa, saying they outed her out of millions of dollars. She’s suing for breach of contract, trademark infringement, and fraud. Salt’s real name is Cheryl James and Pepa’s real name is Sandra Denton.

Spinderella, Salt-N-Pepa


Spinderella joined the group in 1987 but said her issues started back in 1999 when the Best of album was released. She said she was informed she’d get a third of the royalties, $125,000, which she never did. She also said she was told she’d be a part of the duo’s series on VH1, but only made a handful of appearances. She added that she didn’t get anything when the trio performed for the Billboard Music Awards last year.

Spinderella, Pepa, Salt


She reportedly filed after SoundExchange, a royalty company for artists, told her Salt-N-Pepa brought in more than $600K over the past 10 years, which Spinderella said she didn’t get any of.

Insiders responded and said Spinderella is not an owner in the Salt-N-Pepa brand, so she can’t sue for trademark infringement. They added that no one received compensation for the BMA performance and that she was paid as an independent contractor for the Best of album.


Authored by: Char Patterson